Strip solid core wire-Wire Stripping Tutorial

This is a method of stripping wire that one of my friends showed me. I noticed that I use wire for a lot of projects and don't have a wire stripper. This way is useful if you don't have a wire stripper and you're either broke or too lazy to get one. It may seem like it takes a while to do, but once you get used to it it barely takes any time at all. This method is similar to the one by Weissensteinburg , but my friend said that this way may be better for the wire less likely to damage it but I'm not sure.

Strip solid core wire

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction. Do not do this, ever, unless you want to literally die in fire. By Gjdj3 Follow. Insert the cable between the jaws. Figure 1.

Virginia register of historic laces. You have successfully subscribed! Thanks from the HomeTips Team.

The number of different options, terms, and names of connectors can make selecting one, or finding the one you need, daunting. There are a few benefits of twisting the wires together:. Once finished, the wires in your project will be soliv and easier to handle. Strip solid core wire are hammers, vises, needle nose pliers or flat rocks. Any advice would be appreciated. Good: The wire is sticking past the barrel just a little. Both types of wire are covered in insulationwhich is material that does not conduct electricity. If this happens, Strip solid core wire the wire is recommended. In order to crimp connectors onto a wire, a special tool is require for the crimp pin. When using a breadboard or PCB, solid core is perfect because it fits nicely into the holes.

Before you can actually strip electrical wires , you'll need one of two tools to remove the insulation from the copper wire.

  • There are two types of electrical wire that you will commonly encounter in Science Buddies projects: hookup wire and magnet wire.
  • Track My Order.
  • Due to the low-current nature of most LED light systems, most of the wire you find lying around should do the job.
  • A wire is a single, usually cylindrical , flexible strand or rod of metal.

This is a method of stripping wire that one of my friends showed me. I noticed that I use wire for a lot of projects and don't have a wire stripper. This way is useful if you don't have a wire stripper and you're either broke or too lazy to get one. It may seem like it takes a while to do, but once you get used to it it barely takes any time at all.

This method is similar to the one by Weissensteinburg , but my friend said that this way may be better for the wire less likely to damage it but I'm not sure. Feedback is always appreciated! Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. Measure out the lengths of wire that you need and cut them.

You can use your utility knife, or scissors if the utility knife doesn't make it through. I just used the knife. It will work better that way. Using the marker, make a mark about half a cm from the end of the wire on each side.

This isn't strictly neccesary but helps you to see where to cut, which is helpful if you have very small wires or bad lighting. Now, begin scoring around the spot you marked.

This is where the good lighting begins to become important to see your marks and where you cut. Score around the entire wire and try not to nick the actual wire. The whole key is finding the right amount of pressure. You have to make it so it cuts through but doesn't damage the actual wire. This is easy after a couple of tries. Here is the method I use. Hold wire down Apply pressure with knife Keep pressure applied and turn wire Which now brings us to the next step If you can see this all the way around, grab the end and pull it off.

If not, keep cutting. Look at the pictures if this step is at all confusing. Now just repeat for the other end, and the other wires. And there you have it, an easy way to strip wire without wire strippers. If you have any suggestions or problems, please tell me.

Tip 11 months ago. You can also briefly hit the tips of your wires with a propane or butane torch. The heat will cause the insulation to shrink and bare the copper. If the bare wire needs increasing then while it's still hot and some what in a molten state quickly pinch the insulation between your nails and tear it off. The faster you are the less likely it will cause you any real pain. Trim to length. Thanks for sharing this. As a full time handyman for years I used this exact technique very often and used it yesterday too as a matter of fact and can testify that it works wonderfully.

Question 1 year ago on Step 6. I use a pocket knife, and have learned how to nick the cover enough to strip the wire without touching the write. Works every time. Try it, you'll find it easy once you master the technicque. Myself, I prefer to cut the wire with a razor knife but, instead of cutting the wire all the way around and taking the chance of damaging the actual wire.

I cut the wire along it's length and, then peal the wire back as far as I need and, then just clip it off. Reply 3 years ago. I have a CopperMine Manual Wire machine, which is very great for me. I achieve a best result quickly and easily with this machine when I remove the coating of wires or cables without any hitches.

Awesome DIY guide on stripping wire. Easier way: Just tear both ends of the wire s with your teeth! Scissors work well too, you hold the wire against the blades and as you cut they split a bit which allows them to strip the wires.

You gotta love the internet, four years later and the advice here is still useful. I'm a woman, not particularly handy, and I used the burn method to strip my speaker wire. Worked like a charm and I love the sound of my new, clear sounding speakers. Thank you to all above who posted, helping to rid the world of one more set of old static-ey speakers.

Interesting way of doing it. But the fastest and easiest way is to just take a lighter to it for a second, let it cool for a second, and strip it off with your fingernails.

It works very well. Reply 11 years ago on Introduction. At my workplace I have a candle, I just light the candle, and grab one end of wire, and hold the point from where it needs to be stripped over the candle, its the best method without losing a single string..

Reply 10 years ago on Introduction. Wow, really good tip, I'll try that.. Any tip on how to strip those extremely thin mini jack plug cables?

Good instructable. I've never tried it with a utility knife, I think I'd probably get too happy and cut through it. I have to go at it in a much smaller way - I tend to prefer using the tiny little Swiss Army knife scissors I'm usually carrying on me.

I just take the wire, bend it across the lower shear, then carefully close the beak until just the edge of the wire casing is nicked. Then I turn the wire and repeat until I've got a few nicks in it, at which point the casing can just be manually pulled off.

Or, you can use the same tool and simply use the very tip of the scissor beak to nick the casing, and then continue as above. But either way, I can strip a wire in just a few seconds, usually without error. By Gjdj3 Follow. More by the author:. About: Music, chemistry, electronics, etc. Add Teacher Note. Did you make this project?

Share it with us! I Made It! Internet of Things Class. MachF Tip 11 months ago. Reply Upvote. HaremCinema 1 year ago.

BarbaraS Question 1 year ago on Step 6. Answer Upvote. SebastianP 2 years ago. AlenL4 2 years ago. John T MacF Mood 3 years ago. RebeccaT3 4 years ago on Introduction. GeraldM2 4 years ago on Introduction. DC4Projects 5 years ago on Introduction. Mayday 7 years ago on Introduction. Aarn3y 11 years ago on Introduction. Gjdj3 Aarn3y Reply 11 years ago on Introduction.

In general, thicker wire can carry more current. We'll use a quick disconnect for demonstration. Check out Breadboards to get going! The term wire is also used more loosely to refer to a bundle of such strands, as in "multistranded wire", which is more correctly termed a wire rope in mechanics, or a cable in electricity. Most wires have insulation surrounding the metallic core. This is a ft spool of blue wire wrap wire. Try twisting the wires together.

Strip solid core wire

Strip solid core wire

Strip solid core wire

Strip solid core wire

Strip solid core wire. You have successfully subscribed! Thanks from the HomeTips Team.

The differences between the two are not critical to this guide. An approximate scale of several different gauges of wire. The amount of current that a wire can carry depends on a few different factors, for example the composition of the wire, wire length, and condition of the wire. In general, thicker wire can carry more current.

An approximate wire thickness to current capability chart. When using a breadboard or PCB, solid core is perfect because it fits nicely into the holes.

It will get hot and could melt! An assortment of colored wires: you know it's a beautiful thing. Six different colors of solid core wire in a cardboard dispe…. This is a time saving kit of jumper wires - cut, stripped, and pre-bent for your prototyping pleasure. Six different colors of stranded wire in a cardboard dispens…. This is a time saving large kit of jumper wires - cut, stripped, and pre-bent for your prototyping pleasure. Click to Browse More Wire Options! However, there is still an option to use 30 AWG wire wrap if you need to go smaller.

This is a ft spool of blue wire wrap wire. These wires are 30AWG with solid cores. This is a ft spool of white wire wrap wire. Safe, durable electrical connections begin with clean, accurate wire stripping. Removing the outer layer of plastic without nicking the wires underneath is critical.

If a wire does get nicked, the connection may break or an electrical short may occur. No nicks or gouges. These wires have been properly stripped.

A simple manual wire stripper is a pair of opposing blades much like scissors. There are several notches of varying size. This allows the user to match the notch size to the wire size, which is very important for not damaging the wires. Depending on the manufacturer, there may be additional features that include a locking mechanism, have an ergonomic handle, and the ability to cut screws.

These are your basic, run-of-the-mill wire strippers from Techni-Tool with a comfortable grip making them an affordable optio…. These are high grade wire strippers from Techni-Tool with a curved grip making them an affordable option if you need to remov…. Although a knife would also strip the wires, it may also damage the wire by nicking the metal or cutting into it. Using a knife to strip wire is also really dangerous!

The knife can easily slip and cause wicked injuries. There are also self-adjusting wire strippers that automatically strip wire by placing a wire in the middle of the teeth and squeezing the handle.

These take almost any wire and perfectly strip the wires every time. The Self-Adjusting Wire Stripper can take a wire, placed in the head of the tool, compress the handles, and you will have a p….

If you are using a wire wrap tool to wrap a wire around a pin, there may already a built-in stripper blade in the middle to strip the thin wire. Simply place the wire between the blades and pull. This Wire Wrap Too wraps, unwraps, and even strips the appropriate wire diameter with a unique built-in stripper blade. Then by pulling the wire strippers towards the end of the wire, the insulation should slide right off of the wire.

The special self-adjusting wire strippers makes it easy to remove sheaths and stripping multiple insulated wires. For this example, we are going to wire strip a power cable. Place the end of the cable between the tool's wire cutter to cut. When ready, squeeze the handles tp cut the cable end. Turn the plastic guide away from the head and slide it out to adjust the wire length to cut.

Reposition the plastic guide when you are satisfied with the wire length. For cables, you may want to strip more than the recommended guide. Insert the cable between the jaws. After sliding the sheeth from the cable, place the internal wires between the teeth. Adjust the tension of the jaw using the tension knob as necessary depending on the cable and wire size. It is important to match the size of wire to the correct notch in the stripper.

If the notch is too large, the wire will not get stripped. If the notch is too small, there is a risk of damaging the wire. Using an undersized notch means the strippers will close too far, digging into the wire underneath. With stranded wire, the tool will cut off the outer ring of wires, decreasing the total diameter of wire and reduce the strength of the wire.

A nick in solid core wire will severely reduce the strength and flexibility of the wire. The likelihood of the wire breaking upon being bent increases significantly. This wire was not stripped properly, there are gouges and missing strands. If a wire does accidentally get a nick in it, the best plan of action is to cut the damaged part of the wire off and try again.

Prepare the wire by stripping the wires ends using a wire stripper. If you are working with stranded wire, try twisting the ends to group the strands together and tinning the tips before soldering. Cut a piece of heat shrink to cover the exposed wires. Slide the heat shrink through one of the wires. Make sure to slide the heat shrink away from area where you are splicing. Add solder to the wires. Try not to leave the soldering iron on the wires too long.

The insulation can melt away exposing more wire. Flip the wire over and spread solder over the wires. If necessary, add flux and solder to cover wires. If you are using heat shrink, slide it over the terminal to insulate the connection. Apply heat to the heat shrink from a soldering iron or a hot air rework station. An electrical connector is a device for joining electrical circuits together using a mechanical assembly.

The connection may be temporary or serve as a permanent electrical joint between two wires. There are hundreds of types of electrical connectors. Connectors may join two lengths of wire together or connect a wire to an electrical terminal. Below area few connector types. On the far, upper left, we have an insulated splice connector to connect two wire ends together. To the right, the forked connector a. Screws can be partially screwed in before installing the terminal.

The ring terminals in the middle are also useful for connecting wire to screw terminals. While the ring terminal provides a more reliable connection, you would need to completely remove the screw before installing the terminal. On the far, upper right we have a male spade connector a. These can slide into the female spade connector a.

Depending on the design and application, these connectors can come in different flavors like flanged fork or locking ring terminal. These connectors can also come in different sizes and ratings. You will want to match the size of the connectors for a secure connection. The word crimping in this context means to join two pieces of metal together by deforming one or both of them to hold the other. The deformity is called the crimp. The metal has been deformed to pinch the wire and hold it in place.

In order to crimp connectors onto a wire, a special tool is require for the crimp pin. There are several different styles of crimpers available depending on the crimp pin. The best crimper has a built-in ratchet. As the handles are squeezed together, it will ratchet and prevent the jaws from opening back up.

When enough pressure has been applied, the ratchet will disengage and release the crimped part. This ensures enough pressure has been applied. This style of crimper also has a wide jaw to cover more surface area on the connector.

Ratchet Crimp Tool for Quick Disconnectors. Depending on the size of the connector, the type of the "die" i. The crimp tool below uses a different die to crimp smaller crimp pins that slide into a pin connector housing. Ratchet Crimp Tool for Crimp Pins. The images below show different gauges of wire crimped to forked connector and crimp pin for a polarized connector. Manual crimping tools can achieve nearly the same results, although it requires the user be much more vigilant.

This style of crimper is generally less sturdy. Attention must be given while crimping to ensure the jaws are lined up properly on the connector. Misalignment will cause a less than desirable crimp connection. Over time, wear and tear from normal usage can also cause the jaws to become separated and not close fully.

Generally, squeezing it as hard as possible will be sufficient. The fancy wire stripper shown below can be used with quick disconnects. While the self-adjusting wire stripper is a bit harder to work with than a ratchet, it has the ability to strip, cut, and crimp a quick disconnect. There are several arguments for and against using solid core wire with crimp connections. Many believe crimping to solid core wire creates a weak point in the wire, which can lead to breakage.

There is also a greater chance for a crimp connection to come loose with solid core wire because the wire will not conform to the terminal as well. If you must use solid core wire, it is a good idea to solder the wire in place after you crimp it. First, the correct size wire must be chosen for the terminal size, or vice versa.

We'll assume that you are using stranded wire so that th wire conforms to the crimped connection. Next, strip the wire. If the stripped wire fits up into the metal portion of the barrel with little or no free space, the connector is the right size. Good: The wire is sticking past the barrel just a little. The wire and terminal are then inserted into the crimper. Alternatively, if the crimper does not have color markings, use the gauge markings on the side. The terminal should be sitting horizontal with the barrel side up.

The tool is then held perpendicular to the terminal and placed over the barrel, nearest to the ring or other connection type. To finish the crimp, the tool is squeezed with a considerable force. After the crimp is completed, the wire and connector should still hold together after trying to pull them apart with great force.

If the connection can be pulled apart, the crimp was not done correctly. It is better to have the crimp fail now, versus after it has been installed in its application. Below is a military spec chart for crimped connections. Remember, there are hundreds of types of electrical connectors out in the world. Depending on the design, the connector can be designed in a way to fit into a plastic housing.

Instead of a barrel crimping down on a wire, the connector may include two crimp tabs i. The additional crimp tabs for insulation provide strain relief. The crimp pin may also have a locking tab and terminal stop when the pin is inserted in a plastic housing. One example can be found in the pre-terminated, premium jumper wires.

They are used for connecting to PCBs designed with 0. Below is an image of a few crimped pins before being inserted in their plastic housing. On the left is a crimp pin to fit inside a polarized housing.

On the center is a female pin used to mate with the male pin on the right. The process is a bit more tedious since you are working with smaller pins. Depending on your level of experience, this can be time consuming.

However, users can create custom wire lengths and cables for a project. First, cut and strip a piece of wire. Make sure to match the wire gauge with the crimp pin's specifications. After removing the crimp pin from it's metal strip, align the wire strands to the conducting tab and the insulator to the insulator tab to check if the wire meets the crimp pin's specifications. If the wire and stripped sufficiently, insert the crimp pin into one of the crimp tool's jaw.

You may need to bend the insulator's tabs inward to fit. We'll use the bigger jaw. Make sure to take note grooves of the crimp tool when inserting the crimp pin into the die. If you observe closely, there are two semicylindrical grooves cut on one side of the jaw while the other has one groove. The side that has two grooves will be used to crimp the tabs.

Additionally, half of the die is recessed for the insulator tab. Slowly close the ratcheted crimp tool to hold the crimp pin in place and insert the stripped wire.

You may need to adjust the crimp pin so that its insulator tab is flush with the die. When ready, slowly squeeze the handles more to continue crimping the tabs. If something is not right and you are using a ratcheted crimp tool, flip the safety release pin just above the handle. Continue squeezing the handle until the ratchet releases automatically to finish the crimp. Carefully, remove the crimped pin out of the crimp tool. Observe the crimped tabs. You should see something similar to crimped pins below.

If necessary, you may need to re-insert the pin back into the jaws to sufficiently crimp the the tabs. The crimp pin on the far left was partially crimped and needed to be placed in the smaller jaw for a proper crimp.

When ready, insert the crimped pin into its respective housing. Make sure to match the locking tab with hole in the plastic housing. When finished, the wire should snap into its respective housing. Below are a few crimped pins in their respective housing. On the far left, we have crimped pins used for the polarized 1x2 "Molex" connector.

The two on the right with black housing is an example of crimped pins used with the standard 0. Below are a list of common mistakes when crimping quick disconnects and crimp pins. We'll use a quick disconnect for demonstration.

Bad crimp. Connector was too small for the gauge of wire chosen. Too much insulation has been stripped off, too much bare wire exposed. It is also worth mentioning that, while not necessarily harmful, The wire should not be protruding too far past the barrel.

If this happens, trimming the wire is recommended. The excess bare wire should be trimmed off. Strip the 30 AWG wire by inserting it between the wire wrap tool's blades. Pull the wire to remove the insulation. Make sure to strip away enough wire to wrap around a terminal for a sufficient connection. About a 1" should be enough. Insert the exposed wire into the hole along the side.

Make sure to insert the wire on the side with the notch and place the wire in the cut along the side of the cylinder. Insert the wire into header pin a. In this case, male header pins were used on a mini-breadboard.

Rotate the tool clockwise to begin wrapping the wire around the square header pin. I have multi coloured lights, would I need more? March 29, at am. Just a heads up to anyone building lights, thermostat wire is usually 18g solid core wire and is usually available by the foot in 2,3,4,5 wire configurations.

April 24, at am. Be careful with that thermostat wire. This is not what you want. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. Email Address. Search for:. Solid Core vs. Stranded Wire Wire comes in a couple flavors: solid core and stranded. Share this: Share Twitter Facebook Reddit.

Previous post Winter Grow: Next post K vs. Darren Bradley December 11, at pm. Battery or electricity I have multi coloured lights, would I need more? Any advice would be appreciated. Matt March 29, at am. Mike D April 24, at am. Leave a Reply. For help with your own build, please make a thread in the Forum Cancel reply. Subscribe to Blog via Email Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email. The LED Gardener is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.

How to Strip Wire (Without a Wire Stripper): 6 Steps

There are two types of electrical wire that you will commonly encounter in Science Buddies projects: hookup wire and magnet wire. Hookup wire and magnet wire both come in different sizes, measured on a scale called wire gauge. Both types of wire are covered in insulation , which is material that does not conduct electricity. In order to use either type of wire in your science projects, you typically must remove small amounts of insulation from the ends. This tutorial will give you a brief introduction to both types of wire, and how to remove or "strip" the insulation.

You can click through the grey tabs above to learn more about each type, or use the links below to jump right to the section you need. Wire "gauge" is a scale used to measure the diameter of a wire. There are different wire gauge scales, but the most common one you will hear about is American Wire Gauge , abbreviated AWG.

Most Science Buddies projects will tell you exactly what kind of wire you need to buy, so you do not need to worry about the details of the system, or its origins. There are two important things you should understand:. Hookup wire has relatively thick, opaque can not be seen through rubber or plastic insulation, and is frequently used when building circuits or robots, or when using solderless breadboards. There are two different kinds of hookup wire: solid wire and stranded wire. Solid wire has a single solid "core" made out of conductive metal usually copper, or a mix of copper and another metal called an alloy ; it is stronger, but it is not as flexible as stranded wire.

It is usually used when you have to push one end of the wire into a breadboard. Stranded wire is made up of multiple strands of individual wires, which makes it more flexible, but also makes it very difficult to push the ends into a breadboard. Figure 1 shows a close-up of the difference between solid wire and stranded wire:. Figure 1. Solid wire left has a single solid core made out of conductive metal.

It is generally stiffer and less flexible, so bending the wire repeatedly or very sharply can cause it to break. Stranded wire right is made up of many individual strands of smaller wires, and is much more flexible but not as stiff, so cannot easily be used with breadboards. Hookup wire can usually be purchased in two forms: spools or jumper wire kits Figure 2.

Spools provide one continuous segment of wire that you must cut and strip yourself. Jumper wire kits contain many pre-cut short pieces of solid-core wire, with ends that are bent down 90 degrees and already have the insulation removed. This makes them perfect for working with solderless breadboards.

Figure 2. Hookup wire is available in spools with many different colors of insulation left , and in kits with pre-cut lengths center , which can help with color-coding complicated circuits, like on this breadboard right. The American Wire Gauge system actually measures the total cross-sectional area of the metal in a wire.

The cross section of stranded wire is made up of many smaller circles with empty space in between them refer to Figure 1, above , and the AWG system only counts the area of the metal circles, and not the empty space. This means that if a stranded wire and a solid wire have the same wire gauge meaning, they have the same total cross-sectional area of metal , the stranded wire will actually have a slightly bigger total diameter, because of the air gaps in between the individual strands of wire.

No matter how tightly you bundle those ten smaller wires together, there will always be some space in between them, meaning the total outer diameter of your bundle of wires will be slightly larger than the single solid wire. Many wire strippers have separate gauges for solid and stranded wire to account for this difference. The easiest way to strip hookup wire is to use a pair of wire strippers.

They are available at hardware stores, electronics stores like RadioShack, and online retailers like Jameco. If you do not want to spend the money on wire strippers, or your science project is due tomorrow and you do not have time to buy a pair, you can also use a sharp knife with adult supervision , or even a pair of nail clippers.

The following video demonstrates how to strip insulation from hookup wire using three different types of wire strippers or a hobby knife:. Magnet wire has relatively thin enamel coating so it is also called "enamel-coated wire" , and it is frequently used to make electromagnets, solenoids or electrical motors.

Figure 3 shows several spools of magnet wire and two example uses. Figure 3. Left Spools of magnet wire. The enamel coating is usually translucent, but can still come in different colors. Right Two, of many, possible applications for magnet wire: wrapping it around a bolt to create an electromagnet, and building a toy motor. The easiest way to strip the enamel insulation off of magnet wire is to use an abrasive surface like sandpaper.

If sandpaper is not available, other solutions like pinching the wire between two nail files will also work. The following video demonstrates how to strip magnet wire:. Stripping Magnet Wire. There are two important things you should understand: As the wire gauge number gets bigger , the diameter gets smaller. This is counterintuitive and takes some getting used to.

The AWG value does not include the wire's insulation. AWG only measures the diameter of the metal part of the wire. About Hookup Wire Hookup wire has relatively thick, opaque can not be seen through rubber or plastic insulation, and is frequently used when building circuits or robots, or when using solderless breadboards.

Figure 1 shows a close-up of the difference between solid wire and stranded wire: Figure 1. Technical Note The American Wire Gauge system actually measures the total cross-sectional area of the metal in a wire. Stripping Hookup Wire The easiest way to strip hookup wire is to use a pair of wire strippers. About Magnet Wire Magnet wire has relatively thin enamel coating so it is also called "enamel-coated wire" , and it is frequently used to make electromagnets, solenoids or electrical motors.

Stripping Magnet Wire The easiest way to strip the enamel insulation off of magnet wire is to use an abrasive surface like sandpaper. Explore Our Science Videos.

Walking Water Experiment. Why Won't it Mix? Discover the Brazil Nut Effect.

Strip solid core wire

Strip solid core wire