Asian grocery store baltimore-Baltimore-area Asian groceries offer chance to change up meals at home - Baltimore Sun

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Asian grocery store baltimore

Asian grocery store baltimore

Ralph Monte Quae Simpson. Dropping balikbayan box. Honey Powder 3lb 1. To meet the Asiam of the diverse community, the shop carries a wide range of products, and the owners are always willing to add new stock upon request. Transfer ribs to a large plastic bag and seal bag, pressing out excess air.

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Drain the Asian grocery store baltimore out of the wok or Chocolate milke juggs a second wok on medium balhimore to high heat. Explore Together Dig into authentic Korean cuisine at baltimorr number of well known and off-the beaten path restaurants and cafes. This Rosedale grocery has the largest selection of Asian products on the north side of the city. Open for 43 years, Asia Food is valtimore of the oldest Asian Philipines webcam in the area. The flat noodles have different names, based on their width, and are most often used in Thai or Vietnamese food. When the oil is hot, add the crushed garlic and stir fry for 10 seconds. Add 1 cup of water and cook the broccoli, covered, for 4 to 5 minutes, until it turns a bright green color and is tender but still crisp. Joppa Road, Parkville, This shop, which opened in Octoberhas a small produce section but a wide array of snacks and dry goods. In Japan, frogs may be eaten raw, as sashimi.

Cooking a meal is one of the quickest and most enjoyable ways to immerse yourself in the culture of a different country without hopping on a plane.

  • Named for the more than Korean-owned businesses in Howard County that are largely concentrated in this corridor, many offer authentic Korean cuisine, goods, services and cultural and recreational activities.
  • Cooking a meal is one of the quickest and most enjoyable ways to immerse yourself in the culture of a different country without hopping on a plane.
  • Search results are sorted by a combination of factors to give you a set of choices in response to your search criteria.
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Cooking a meal is one of the quickest and most enjoyable ways to immerse yourself in the culture of a different country without hopping on a plane. Getting to know the flavors, ingredients and cooking techniques embraced abroad provides insight that can't be gleaned from reading a book or watching a movie.

In recent years, the international aisles of supermarkets have grown and vastly improved, making culinary exploration easier and more accessible. But there is still no substitute for shopping at a market that specializes in a particular cuisine. The food of Asian cultures, especially, often requires ingredients that can't be found just anywhere. Fortunately, in and around the Baltimore area, numerous Asian grocery stores carry ingredients that are difficult to find in regular grocery stores.

From the famously smelly durian fruit and unusual types of tea to dried jellyfish and seemingly infinite varieties of noodles, Baltimore's Asian shops — and their shopkeepers — have you covered. The Baltimore area's Asian grocery-store scene is strongest in Catonsville and Howard County, where three large supermarkets — H Mart, Lotte Plaza and Great Wall — serve a diverse community with pockets of immigrants from several Asian countries.

Those stores are worth the drive from anywhere in the area, but the smaller shops that cater to local communities also carry thoughtful selections of ingredients from countries across Asia. Even the small shops carry a wide variety of certain products, such as noodles. At larger stores, hundreds of noodle options are available. Like Italian pasta, Asian noodles come in different shapes and sizes and they may be either dried or fresh. Some are made with wheat, others with rice, and a few types are made from something else altogether mung bean threads, used in Thai and Vietnamese cooking, are made from mung bean paste, for example.

Some of the most commonly used wheat noodles include soft, yellow lo mein and skinny crispy chow mein, both of which are made with eggs and are frequently used in Chinese cooking. Other wheat noodles include thick udon, often used in Japanese soup; the Japanese buckwheat noodle called soba; and ramen, the well-known noodle that is both a cheap, quick, instant food and associated with trendy noodle bars.

In the United States, delicate rice vermicelli is a frequently used ingredient, as are the flat, long noodles used in pad thai, soups and stir fries.

The flat noodles have different names, based on their width, and are most often used in Thai or Vietnamese food. Asian cooking novices may also be wowed by the aisles of sauces.

Though soy sauce, the dark, salty sauce made with wheat and soybeans, is a familiar sight, several other sauces play major roles in Asian cuisine. Fish sauce, which results from the process of fish fermentation, adds intense flavor to savory dishes but be warned: on its own, fish sauce does not taste good ; oyster sauce, which derives its flavor from oyster shells, is thick, salty and sweet. The Chinese sauce hoisin is sticky and sweet and is typically used as a glaze for meat or as a cold dipping sauce.

And rice vinegars, of which there are many types, are used to add acidity to dishes across Asian cuisines.

The next time you're in search of a specific ingredient — or simply some inspiration — check out one of these Asian markets in and around the city:. This shop, which opened in October , has a small produce section but a wide array of snacks and dry goods. One refrigerated case near the produce is particularly well stocked with great finds, from steamed buns to lotus seed cakes. Open for 43 years, Asia Food is one of the oldest Asian groceries in the area.

Though the owners, the Toung family, are Taiwanese, the shop carries an impressive selection of Thai ingredients. Asia Food also does a strong wholesale business, and don't miss the aisles of reasonably priced cookware and dishes.

The Brooklyn, N. The store feels enormous and comprehensive, with ingredients from multiple Asian cultures. From sausage to jellyfish to an aisle stocked entirely with different types of dried mushrooms, the selection at Great Wall is mind-blowing. It also stocks live frogs: In Chinese cooking, live frogs are sometimes fried, whole and alive, in hot oil, seasoned with garlic, ginger and other spices. In Japan, frogs may be eaten raw, as sashimi.

In the United States, both practices have caused controversy; for a brief time in and , the sale of live frogs was prohibited — in part for ecological reasons — in California. The grocery store chain has multiple locations in Maryland and is frequently lauded for its Korean specialties, from prepared foods to marinades to meat that has been pre-sliced and rolled in preparation for cooking in a hot pot.

This Rosedale grocery has the largest selection of Asian products on the north side of the city. The look is no-frills, with many items still sitting in cardboard boxes, but the mix of products is great, including goat meat, unusual cuts of beef and a variety of live seafood, swimming in tanks in the back of the store.

Ha Ha's in-store restaurant earns high praise, too, for its Cantonese specialties including roast duck and pig. Lotte Plaza has a lot in common with H Mart: the stores are similar in size and are near one another, both include restaurants and both have Korean roots.

Lotte Plaza also carries a fairly extensive selection of Indian and Latino ingredients. This downtown Baltimore shop is small but friendly and well stocked.

It caters largely to students who live in the neighborhood the University of Maryland Medical Center and School of Law are both nearby. To meet the needs of the diverse community, the shop carries a wide range of products, and the owners are always willing to add new stock upon request.

This Parkville shop is larger than it appears at first glance, and carries a variety of products, including many types of fish and meats. The market is located next to a Filipino restaurant and carries some specialties of the Philippines, including balut — a hard-boiled duck egg containing a partially formed embryo. For some, shopping at Asian grocery stores can be intimidating because the ingredients are often unfamiliar.

A good way to jump in is by making one or more of these recipes, which range from familiar to advanced. Local blogger and cookbook author Kathy Patterson minxeats. Reserve remaining sesame seed powder for serving. Transfer ribs to a wide 6- to 8-quart heavy pot and add the 3 cups of water and ginger. Simmer, tightly covered, until ribs are very tender, about 3 hours. Skim fat from sauce and pour sauce through a sieve lined with a dampened paper towel, into a bowl, then discard solids.

Serve ribs with sauce in shallow bowls and sprinkle with reserved scallion greens and remaining sesame seed powder. During his cooking classes, chef Thomas Casey, owner of For the Love of Food, helps people of all ages learn to have fun and feel comfortable in the kitchen.

His recipe for the Chinese-American favorite chicken and broccoli is cooked using a wok or two. Even smaller Asian markets sell specialized cookware, like woks, as well as dishes and chopsticks.

In a bowl, mix together the egg white, cornstarch and salt. To "velvet" the chicken, add the egg-white mixture to the chicken cubes to coat. While the chicken is marinating, prepare the sauce and vegetables. Wash and drain the broccoli. Cut the stalk diagonally into thin slices and cut the flowerets into 3 or 4 pieces. Preheat a wok. Heat 2 cups oil in the wok until it reaches degrees. Test the heat by placing a piece of chicken in the wok; it should float. Add the chicken cubes and let cook until they just turn white, about 30 seconds, using a wooden spoon or chopsticks to gently separate them.

Quickly remove the chicken cubes from the wok as soon as they turn white, and drain in a colander or on paper towels. Drain the oil out of the wok or preheat a second wok on medium high to high heat.

Add 2 tablespoons oil. Add the broccoli, sprinkle the salt and sugar over, and stir fry briefly, turning down the heat if necessary to make sure it doesn't burn. Add 1 cup of water and cook the broccoli, covered, for 4 to 5 minutes, until it turns a bright green color and is tender but still crisp. Clean out the wok and heat 5 more tablespoons oil. Add the broccoli and velveted chicken, stirring and tossing to cook the chicken through.

Add the sauce and cornstarch mixture to the center of the wok and stir quickly to thicken. Skip to content. Mirin, the low-alcohol Japanese rice wine, adds sweetness and slight acidity to dishes.

A-Mart Food Market. Joppa Road, Parkville, Asia Food. Great Wall Supermarket. Ha Ha Food Market. Lotte Plaza Market. Multiple locations including:. Potung Trading. Towson Oriental Food Market. Recipes to try. Korean-style short ribs. Grind sesame seeds to a coarse powder in spice or coffee grinder. Add short ribs to soy-sauce mixture, rubbing mixture into them. Transfer ribs to a large plastic bag and seal bag, pressing out excess air.

Marinate, chilled, for at least 8 hours. Transfer ribs to a platter using tongs and keep warm, covered with foil. Marinate the velveted chicken in a sealed container in the refrigerator for 30 minutes. In another small bowl, mix the 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon cornstarch with water and set aside.

When the oil is hot, add the crushed garlic and stir fry for 10 seconds. Remove from the wok and drain. Mix everything together and serve hot over steamed rice. We ranked 26 fast-food fried-chicken sandwiches including Popeyes. Review: No mutinies over the food at this Elkridge pirate bar. Baltimore is experiencing a coffee renaissance.

The flat noodles have different names, based on their width, and are most often used in Thai or Vietnamese food. Even smaller Asian markets sell specialized cookware, like woks, as well as dishes and chopsticks. The Chinese sauce hoisin is sticky and sweet and is typically used as a glaze for meat or as a cold dipping sauce. Suggest a Business. Do you have a favorite restaurant or cultural attraction that should be added to this list?

Asian grocery store baltimore

Asian grocery store baltimore

Asian grocery store baltimore. Korean Way

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Does the Towson Oriental Food Market sell smoked eels or any other smoke fish? Not the fish packaged in cans. I am trying to find a local Baltimore MD area source for whole smoke fish.

Sometimes Oriental Super Markets carry smoked fish. In the s and s vendors in the NorthEast market on Monument Street in Baltimore sold all sorts of smoked fish, usually eel and white fish. Ralph Monte Quae Simpson. Jump to. Sections of this page. Accessibility help. Email or Phone Password Forgotten account? Explore local businesses on Facebook. Sign Up. Towson Oriental Food Market Grocers. If any one knows of a retail source for this product please post the info here.

Thank you, CharlieH. Lots of favorite snacks. Towson Oriental Food Market. Dropping balikbayan box. Woo hoo Look what I found!!! Near Towson Oriental Food Market. Related Pages. Women's Health Associates Pregnancy care centre.

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Asian grocery store baltimore

Asian grocery store baltimore