Sleeping and peeing but not eating-Urinary Problems and Injuries, Age 12 and Older | Michigan Medicine

Jump to content. Top of the page Check Your Symptoms. Most people will have some kind of urinary problem or injury in their lifetime. Urinary tract problems and injuries can range from minor to more serious. Sometimes, minor and serious problems can start with the same symptoms.

Sleeping and peeing but not eating

Rinse well and dry thoroughly. Urinary problems and injuries are a concern in children. Regular checkups are even more critical for cats because they instinctively hide signs of illness. For more information, see the topic Diaper Rash. Shaking chills are a severe, intense form of shivering.

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His whole mannerism Sleeping and peeing but not eating the way he carries himself is different and weak. You said you "think". The Cat Lounge. I want to bring him to the vet, but 1- it is Sunday and a lot of vets are not open, and 2-the cost of the emergency vet is so high and I don't think I will be able to afford it. However, if he is not eating and not moving around and his ears feel warm, he needs to go to the vet right away. I'm hoping to motivate him to eat later tonight, or at the very least drink something. Cancer is a strong possibility, says Vernaleken, or it could be a kidney or liver problem or a hormonal imbalance, among other things. He's normally a picky eater so the only thing he eats without question and hesitation is Fancy Feast. I'm not feeding the kitten that won't eat any milk right now to see if I can get it to eat the dry food but I am concerned as I don't want to starve it. I would set him on his feet to have a feel of his ribs and stomach, checked his limbs, mouth, ears and they seem fine from what I can.

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Just like clockwork, it's time to get up and pee again. If it seems like the bane of getting a continuous night of sleep in middle age and beyond, it may not have to be. Learn a surprising reason why you may have to wake to urinate at night and how improvement can occur without seeing a urologist, but a sleep specialist instead.

It is considered abnormal if you wake more than once at night to urinate. Ideally, you wouldn't wake at all. These awakenings can disturb sleep and contribute to insomnia, especially when they occur frequently or towards morning. What causes frequent urination at night, a condition known as nocturia, and what can be done about it? In both women and men, nightly awakenings to urinate appear to be associated with poor sleep, even when other factors such as pain and other medical conditions are taken into account.

In fact, nocturia may be the single most common factor associated with poor sleep among the elderly 1. Many people, including doctors, have the wrong idea about the cause of nocturia. Too often men of a certain age are told it is due to an enlarged prostate. Women might blame excessive fluid intake in the evening, a hyperactive bladder, loss of bladder control, or even menopause.

Prescription medications are paraded out to mixed effect. Men may have painful procedures to reduce the prostate's constriction of the urethra. What if something else entirely is to blame? With aging, there is another phenomenon that often becomes apparent in sleep: obstructive sleep apnea. In fact, the risk increases fold in women at the time of menopause 2.

This condition is characterized by repeated pauses in breathing that lead to awakenings, sleep fragmentation, drops in blood oxygen levels, and - nocturia 3. Sleep apnea is associated with other classic symptoms, including:.

If any of these other symptoms are present, it may be necessary to investigate sleep apnea as a potential cause of nocturia. As an aside, in an important pairing alcohol often causes people to wake to urinate more at night because it also contributes to both snoring and sleep apnea. Many people say that they get up to urinate because they are awake, their bladder feels somewhat full, and they aren't sure that they'll get back to sleep unless they do.

As discussed, sleep-disordered breathing may trigger these awakenings, yet why is the bladder full? The body normally releases anti-diuretic hormone ADH in sleep to prevent needing to wake to urinate. It works to shut down the kidneys, preventing movement of fluids from the blood vessels to the bladder. The bladder is like a storage balloon, and there is no need to wake to empty it if the fluid isn't there to start.

No matter how well or poorly the bladder may function, or whether an enlarged prostate obstructs or not, without urine filling the bladder from overactive kidneys, these other issues should not matter.

Research and clinical experience demonstrates that sleep apnea changes the release of ADH 4. More severe sleep apnea may lead to pulmonary hypertension and right-sided heart failure. The body responds to this strain by stopping the release of ADH, which causes more urine to be produced, filling the bladder and triggering awakenings to pee during sleep.

When sleep apnea is effectively treated, most often with the use of continuous positive airway pressure CPAP , these effects are quickly reversed 5. CPAP delivers a constant flow of air through a face mask that keeps the airway open and prevents the associated changes. Both men and women wake less to pee at night. Sleep quality substantially improves as fragmented sleep is relieved. CPAP doesn't treat the bladder. It doesn't shrink the prostate. It doesn't make you less thirsty or dry you out.

It doesn't put you in a deep sleep so you can't wake to pee. It simply treats one of the most common and often overlooked causes of nighttime urination.

In so doing, those trips to the bathroom abate and often are fully eliminated. For those who are convinced that getting up to pee is because of how much fluid was consumed in the evening, your age, an enlarged prostate or a weak bladder, think again.

If you have some of the other symptoms associated with sleep apnea, meet with your doctor and get the evaluation and treatment you need to once again sleep through the night. Nocturia and disturbed sleep in the elderly. Sleep Med ; Bixler EO et al. Sleep-disordered breathing and nocturia in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc ; Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with overactive bladder and urgency incontinence in men.

Sleep ; Continuous positive airway pressure reduces nocturia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Urology ; Brandon R. Peters, M. This Center is the birthplace of sleep medicine and includes research, clinical, and educational programs that have advanced the field and improved patient care for decades.

To learn more, visit us at: sleep. The Center is the birthplace of sleep medicine and includes research, clinical, and educational programs that have advanced the field and improved patient care for decades. News U. HuffPost Personal Video Horoscopes.

Newsletters Coupons. Follow Us. Part of HuffPost Wellness. All rights reserved. By Brandon R. Snoring Excessive daytime sleepiness Insomnia Frequent nighttime awakenings Witnessed pauses in breathing Gasping or choking in sleep Dry mouth at night Palpitations Heartburn Night sweats Teeth grinding Bruxism Morning headaches Concentration and memory problems Mood problems.

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He won't even eat or drink. Welcome to The Cat Site your cat community. I hope it's nothing serious but I do hope that the vet expresses to your mom how important it is to get a kitty who's behaving like that in quickly. Log in. Weight loss. If he is eating and just sleeping a lot, it can probably wait until the next day.

Sleeping and peeing but not eating

Sleeping and peeing but not eating

Sleeping and peeing but not eating. What your dog’s restlessness, skin issues and tummy trouble could be trying to tell you

However, the one that is refusing to eat the dry cat food or drink the water, will drink milk. I'm not feeding the kitten that won't eat any milk right now to see if I can get it to eat the dry food but I am concerned as I don't want to starve it. I have tried to soften the dry cat food with water and force a little into its mouth so it can get used to the taste.

Otherwise, the kitten appears very healthy. I'm thinking possibly my little kitten is just stubborn and not ready to wean. Any advice is welcome as I'm not sure if I'm doing the right thing. Thank you! You can't let a kitten go even 24 hours without eating, so whatever it takes Whatever the reason, the kitten must eat and if it will not, should see a vet. I found a kitten, probably about 7 months old, in the backyard not too long ago, and I think he has a fever.

All he does is sleep and he doesn't really move around much. I want to bring him to the vet, but 1- it is Sunday and a lot of vets are not open, and 2-the cost of the emergency vet is so high and I don't think I will be able to afford it.

What should I do? If he has a fever, he needs to see a vet. Also, you don't know if he indeed even has a fever. You said you "think". Is he eating? If he is eating and just sleeping a lot, it can probably wait until the next day. However, if he is not eating and not moving around and his ears feel warm, he needs to go to the vet right away. I just got an eight week old kitten. I brought her home and at first she wouldn't eat anything at all.

Persistent or progressive coughing or acute coughing should also be checked right away, says Wolfus. They could mean kennel cough, influenza, pneumonia, heart disease, heartworm disease or even cancer. A distended belly. A distended abdomen could be a sign of internal bleeding, bloat or a hormonal disease — all emergencies, according to Vernaleken.

It could be something mild or a ligament tear, a fracture, a tick-born disease such as Lyme or even arthritis , says Wolfus. Eye problems. If your dog has red eyes, is blinking a lot or pawing at the face, have him checked right away. It could be a corneal scratch or ulcer, a detached retina, glaucoma or even a breed-specific illness such as dry-eye syndrome, says Wolfus.

Ear problems. If your dog is shaking her head, scratching her ears or if you notice redness, swelling, a bad smell or any discharge in the ear canal, that may be a sign of yeast, ear mites, bacteria or even allergies, says Vernaleken. Time for a vet visit.

Skin issues. If you pooch is scratching, licking or biting himself, has a hot spot or hair loss in an area, take him to the vet. It could be allergic dermatitis, fleas or even allergy to fleas, says Vernaleken. And always trust your gut, says Wolfus. Daniela Caride is a freelance writer who has four cats and two dogs. She blogs about being a pet parent at Taildom. Guide to Power Strips and Surge Protectors. Next Story. Ask the Expert.

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How To Stop Waking Up At Night To Pee

Do you find yourself waking up more than once to use the bathroom at night? You may have nocturia , a condition that causes you to need to get out of bed to pee 2 or more times in one night. And while a couple extra trips to the bathroom may seem harmless, it can lead to fragmented, disrupted sleep, leaving you tired and cranky the next day.

It may sound funny to track your bathroom visits, but a bladder diary is a great tool in identifying the culprits that may be causing you to use the bathroom more often at night.

A bladder diary will track your fluid intake type and amount , how often you use the bathroom during the day, how often you get up to use the bathroom at night, and whether or not that accompanies any bladder leakage.

Keep it for days to help you spot any trends. This tool is also useful for your doctor so hang onto it and share it with him or her on your next visit. Avoid excessive fluid intake hours before bed this includes both food and drinks. Avoid caffeine after the morning and limit alcohol at night. Both alcohol and caffeine can make urine more acidic which can irritate the lining of the bladder, causing you to need the bathroom more frequently.

Take any medications that may act as diuretics earlier in the day if possible check with your doctor on this first. If your ankles or legs swell up during the day, the fluid that builds up then gets sent back into the bloodstream when you lie down to sleep, which increases your blood pressure.

As a result, the kidneys start working overtime to create more urine so your body can flush the excess fluid out of your system, and consequently causing you to wake up to empty your bladder.

Elevate the legs periodically to avoid any fluid build up in the ankles and calves. Use Compression Socks. These elastic stockings exert pressure against the leg while decreasing pressure on the veins, allowing fluids to be redistributed and reabsorbed into the bloodstream. While waking up to go to the bathroom may be the culprit of your insomnia, it could also be that not being able to go or stay asleep could be contributing to nocturia.

Many people only think they have to go to the bathroom at night but when they get up to go, they produce just a trickle. This may mean that insomnia, and not nocturia, is actually the culprit and can be caused by a host of different reasons. Avoid foods that may be disruptive right before sleep like spicy or heavy, rich foods.

Nocturia is most often caused by nocturnal polyuria, a condition where the kidneys produce too much urine. In reality, both conditions should be treated to effectively manage their respective symptoms. Download our guide to Preparing For Your Doctor Visit to help you talk to your doctor about nocturia.

National Association for Continence is a national, private, non-profit c 3 organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of patients with incontinence, bladderleakage, bedwetting, OAB, SUI, nocturia, neurogenic bladder, pelvic organ prolapse, and pelvic floor disorders. NAFC's purpose is to be the leading source for public education and advocacy about the causes, prevention, diagnosis, treatments and management alternatives for incontinence.

All rights reserved. Unauthorized use prohibited. NAFC is a qualified c 3 tax-exempt organization. Contact Us. Looking for something specific? Search for it here:. Below are 5 things you can try to stop those frequent trips to the bathroom at night. Avoid excessive fluid intake hours before bed this includes both food and drinks Avoid caffeine after the morning and limit alcohol at night.

Empty your bladder before bed. Set a consistent sleep and wake time. Exercise regularly but not right before bed Avoid foods that may be disruptive right before sleep like spicy or heavy, rich foods Reserve the bed for sleep and sex Establish a regular relaxing bedtime routine Keep your bedroom quite, comfortable, and dark.

Behavioral Therapies For Reducing Nocturia. Incontinence: Myths VS. Sometimes, A New Perspective Can

Sleeping and peeing but not eating